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Thursday, May 26
7pm Doors // 8pm Show
$32

David Allan Coe
w/ special guest Jason Callahan

All tickets previously purchased will be honored for the new date and no action is needed.

Concessions and full bars open! Also featuring local favorites Nancy's A-Maize-N Sandwich Booth.
All Ages
Support acts subject to change
Text COUNTRY to 49798 for concert updates.
A limited number of table reservations are available by calling 316-722-4201 or in person at The Cotillion.
Coat check is open during events to check your coats, hats, merch and more.  Coat check is located next to merch by the front doors.
All sales are final.  No exchanges or refunds unless a show is cancelled or postponed.

COVID-19 Show Policy: There are no restrictions on this show but we encourage face masks when you can not social distance and ask that you stay home if you are feeling sick or have been exposed recently to someone with COVID-19.  

The Mysterious Rhinestone Cowboy. The Original Outlaw. The Legend.

Born in Akron, Ohio, US, Coe lived a troubled youth, spending much of his time in and out of various youth correctional facilities. Having befriended each other in prison, it is thought that Coe was inspired to pursue a career in music by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, with the pair thought to have written songs together whilst behind bars. Upon release from a prison term, Coe took heed of Hawkins’ advice and travelled to Nashville to begin a career in music, where he caught the attention of Plantation Records, releasing his debut album “Penitentiary Blues” in 1970.

Coe became one of the most desired songwriters in the Nashville scene, writing hit songs for artists such as Billie Joe Spears’ 1972 song “Souvenirs and California Mem’rys” and Tanya Tucker’s number one hit in 1973, “Would You Lay With Me (in a field of stone). Despite this success, he had not managed to forge a path with his own career as a solo artist, remaining an underground talent, unable to break into the mainstream charts. Although in 1975, his second record, “Once upon a Rhyme, “ featured the number ten hit of his cover of Steve Goodman’s and John Prine’s “You Never Even Called Me By My Name.”

Moving to Key West,Florida, US, Coe independently released two albums, the comedy inspired “Nothing Sacred” (1978) and his controversial “Underground Album” (1982). Coe again enjoyed chart success in the 1980s, with his hit songs “The Ride” (1983) and “Mona Lisa Lost Her Smile” (1984). Since the 90s, Coe has being involved in a number of collaborative efforts, most notably “Rebel Meets Rebel,” a joint effort by Coe and Dimebag Darell and his brother Vinnie Paul alongside Rex Brown, a pioneering work fusing country with metal.

As a talented songwriter and charismatic performer, Coe has garnered legendary status in the world of country music, alongside his wild tales and behaviour. His lyrics have spurred controversy, featuring frequent profanities, tales of drug use and sexually explicit material, gaining him the title of the ‘outlaw’s outlaw.’ With his throaty baritone and dirty grooves, Coe’s honky-tonk country certainly sounds pretty badass.